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Map Legend: 28%, 75 of 263 Territories

Saturday, July 4, 2009

Food of Tobago!

The first thing to understand about the food in Tobago is that it is expensive relative to services because they import just about everything except mangos and chickens. This detracts a bit from the food itself. The food is generally average, and I'm sure the seafood would be good if we ate seafood. The most exciting parts are the roti, which is prevalent thanks to the large Indian minority, and the candy sold on the street, which mostly consists of sugar patties with various fruits and spices. Our favorite was coconut with ginger and cinnamon. Here's Tara eating one:
They also have amazing coconut cream cookies, made by Wibisco instead of Nabisco:



Most of the restaurants don't believe in menus, so we are reduced to asking what each item is and how much it costs, but we still don't know what regularly goes together, which is how we ended up with a "coconut bake" without any filling (below). Apparently this is just the bread all by itself. They also like this bark called Mauby, which is sort of like rootbeer. Fairly tasty. On average, a fast food meal costs about $6 and a nicer sit down meal cost about $15-$20.


We had some good homemade coconut and peanut butter ice cream (two flavors, not one), but it is really expensive here due to the cost of refrigeration. We wll hope for better ice cream luck in the future.

In the way of fruits, we had the best mango ever yesterday and some excellent bananas earlier in the week. For those that don't know, most of the fruit imported to the US are varieties chosen for shelf life rather than taste, making some of the best fruit that grown overseas.

Lastly, we are starting an official street food section for each country. Tobago doesn't have much, though they have some huts along the side of the road with lunch food. The easy winner in Tobago is the candy sold along the side of the road. As mentioned above, we particularly liked the coconut/ginger/cinammon concoction.

5 comments:

  1. Love hearing from you!
    Mama

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  2. Ooh, I'm so happy to have updates and pictures! I feel like I've seen a Mauby Fizz somewhere before...

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  3. Happy One Month Anniversary!

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  4. I need more of a description of the peanut punch! Is it really like a peanut juice?

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  5. The peanut punch is a bit like a peanut butter milkshake. Peanuts (or maybe peanut butter), sweet condensed milk, regular milk, and ice. Very tasty and Tara misses them now.

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